New Zealand: Coal rail line blockaded

From Aotearoa (New Zealand) indymedia: http://indymedia.org.nz/index.php

The Save Happy Valley Coalition has begun a blockade of the main rail line
that coal miner Solid Energy uses to transport coal between the West Coast
and Christchurch. There are two people locked into the railway tracks in
prelaid concrete, much like a blockade in 2005, and they have thus far
resisted efforts by police to remove them.

The blockade began around midday, and about 20 protesters clambered over the
first stopped coal train and displayed a 22 metre banner reading "Solid
Energy: Govt Sponsored Climate Chaos".

From their media release: "Solid Energy is ever increasing its production,
leaving decimated ecosystems and waterways in its wake. Already, they are
responsible for annual carbon dioxide emissions approximately equivalent to
New Zealand's entire transport fleet. Saying "no" to new coal mines would be
an easy first step in actually addressing climate change," said Simon
Riddel, one of the activists locked to the tracks.

Update
2.30pm: The blockaders have been declared prisoners, and a police line has
formed around them. Their support person has been arrested for communicating
with prisoners while trying to get water to them.
3:15pm: After about 3 and a half hours, police managed to dig a large enough
hole and drag one of the blockaders through, and have since managed to cut
open the lockbox Three arrests in total..

Investigation Uncovers Carbon Credits Smokescreen

By Fiona Harvey / Stephen Fidler

LONDON – Companies and individuals rushing to go green have been spending millions on “carbon credit” projects that yield few if any environmental benefits.A Financial Times investigation has uncovered widespread failings in the new markets for greenhouse gases, suggesting some organisations are paying for emissions reductions that do not take place.

Others are meanwhile making big profits from carbon trading for very small expenditure and in some cases for clean-ups that they would have made anyway. 0426 04

The growing political salience of environmental politics has sparked a “green gold rush”, which has seen a dramatic expansion in the number of businesses offering both companies and individuals the chance to go “carbon neutral”, offsetting their own energy use by buying carbon credits that cancel out their contribution to global warming.

The burgeoning regulated market for carbon credits is expected to more than double in size to about $68.2bn by 2010, with the unregulated voluntary sector rising to $4bn in the same period.

The FT investigation found:

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Indiana: Action against Duke Energy’s involvement in Mountaintop Removal and Plan Puebla Panama

Action against Duke Energy: Against Plan Puebla Panama and Mountain Top Removal

Approximately ten demonstrators shut down the Bloomington office for Duke Energy yesterday for a few minutes before pushed out by loyal company managers. The action was in response to Duke Energy’s involvement in the recently revived Plan Puebla Panama- a globalization infrastructure scheme that will destroy communities across Mesoamerica. The demo also occurred in solidarity with communities in Appalachia that continue to be devastated by Mountain Top Removal, a practice which Duke Energy relies upon to continue their production of electricity for profit.In both Mesoamerica and Appalachia, threatened communities have taken up a struggle to defend their lives and homes, a struggle which continues to challenge the ability of multinationals to extract profit from suffering and from ecocide. Its offensive (though we are not surprised) to find that those involved in such projects of death can continue to do business with no consequences whatsoever. Thus, Duke Energy can now count upon the fact that they will face demonstrations until they withdraw completely from the PPP and from Mountain Top Removal. In addition to the demonstration, concerned locals have also begun an effort to share information about Duke Energy’s bloody hands via posters and flyers.

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