Civil Disobedience Action at APEC CEO Summit Demands “People and Planet over Profits” and Ceasefire in Gaza 

Contacts: No to APEC Coalition Media Team:
Patrick Nevada  (808) 388-8438. media.notoapec@gmail.com
Bev Tang (773) 968-5628

Civil Disobedience Action at APEC CEO Summit Demands “People and Planet over Profits” and Ceasefire in Gaza 

 “Business as Usual” Meeting Between Heads of State and Corporate Executives Successfully Disrupted

Photos and videos for download here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1CAZK8SHZ2Yi-Y1dMQMiaQZG_3SlJknpz?usp=sharing

San Francisco, CA – Members of the No to APEC Coalition engaged in a civil disobedience action by blocking access to the site of the APEC CEO Summit at the Moscone West Convention Center in defiance of the hyper-militarized structures erected by the local and federal government. This action is the latest effort by the No to APEC Coalition during its months-long campaign to highlight the global and local harms of free trade and global free market agendas while demanding an immediate ceasefire in Gaza.

“We know APEC and IPEF do not represent the interest of the people or the planet,” said Rhonda Ramiro from the No to APEC Coalition. “We are fighting for a different world. A world where all workers have pay and workplace protection, where all working people have the right to unionize and organize, where value is what you contribute to the community. We call on the people to join us in shutting down APEC!”

Today’s scheduled APEC CEO Summit included panels on sustainability and climate which featured Exxon Mobil CEO Darren Woods as well as heads of state including Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. While demonstrators locked themselves together to block entrances to the CEO Summit and called for “War Criminals Out of SF,” almost 200 gathered outside the Ritz Carlton to protest against Marcos Jr for “greenwashing”  and selling out the Philippines to foreign investors.

“They call it free trade,” said Suzanne Ali from the Palestinian Youth Movement. “In reality, it is forced migration, it is destruction of the environment, it is destruction of our people, it is the depletion of natural resources, it is the fueling of war and genocide, and ultimately at the heart of it, is bloodthirst for profit.”

Will Wiltschko from Bay Climate Action said “Young people everywhere are angry at world leaders not taking action on climate change. The Indo-Pacific trade deal they’re expecting to announce this week ignores the climate reality that people around the world are facing. This ongoing collusion between APEC leaders and huge corporations won’t be tolerated.”

Organizations are condemning the anti-worker agenda of APEC which they claim will especially harm women. “The big tech agenda on women claims to advance women’s equality, when in reality these jobs pigeonhole women into low paying, exploitative jobs,” explains Katie Comfort of the International Women’s Alliance, “all while they make record breaking profits, and expand to new markets in these Asian countries.”

Conny Ford, a participant who risked arrest explained, “I am participating today because many of us workers have been through the last free trade deal for the southern hemispheres and it was a disaster. It was a disaster because no worker organizations were there at the table, and it meant low wages, extreme exploitation, and jobs shipped to the cheapest locations.”

 

Many of the corporations represented at the CEO summit including GM, Amazon and Kaiser have recently seen massive worker strikes and walkouts demanding better pay and working conditions. “Big tech seeks to offshore and outsource jobs for AI generation, customer service, and development on women so they can pay them unlivable wages and string them along with contractual work – all while they make record breaking profits, and expand to new markets in these Asian countries.”

“My family lost their house during Hurricane Maria and thousands of Puerto Ricans lost their lives. Our lives are threatened by the climate crisis that corporations like Exxon created and banks like Citi continue to finance,” said CJ Acevedo, with Climate Defenders. “That’s why this morning we performed a symbolic wedding to denounce the union between the CEOs of Citibank and ExxonMobil, who are sponsoring this event.”

In the wake of President Biden’s meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping, organizers are expressing concern that APEC’s profit-driven agenda will only breed further militarization and war in the Pacific Rim. Cody Urban with the Resist US Led War movement warns, “Biden’s complete disregard for the calls from the world for a ceasefire in Palestine and an end to the genocidal Israeli assault proves the White House only serves to keep the war industry alive.”

Over 150 organizations internationally – including unions, environmental justice groups, and migrant communities from APEC countries, have united under the No to APEC Coalition’s banner call of “People and Planet Over Profit Plunder.” In the lead up to the APEC Summit, the No to APEC Coalition’s efforts culminated in a resolution that passed unanimously within the SF Board of Supervisors, which dedicated $10 million towards local communities and small businesses who have been severely crippled by the APEC conference.

For more information, visit: linktr.ee/no2apec

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Cop City Protesters Tried to Plant Trees. Atlanta Police Beat Them for It.

cross-posted from The Intercept

by Natasha Lennard

Organizers swore off violence, but the cops used their garden tools as an excuse to attack them anyway.

DEKALB COUNTY, Ga. — Dozens of protesters began gathering early Monday morning in a small, unremarkable park in southeast Atlanta. By 9 a.m., over 400 people — a coalition of local Atlantans and visiting activists from around the country — had assembled to attend a day of protests dubbed “Block Cop City.” The event was just the latest mass demonstration in over two years of resistance against the construction of a vast police training facility, known as Cop City, over hundreds of acres of Atlanta’s forest land.

Cops reacted to the day of action by attacking a slow-moving, peaceful march with tear gas and rubber bullets, just the latest reminder of why the compound, designed to further militarized counterinsurgency policing, should never be built.

Organizers were clear from the start: The protest activities — as had been agreed on in hourslong meetings in the prior days — would not involve property damage to construction vehicles at the site of the planned police facility. The tactic had been tried before, when a small amount of vandalism during a March day of action led to indiscriminate arrests and overreaching state domestic terrorism charges against 42 activists.

Monday’s participants planned simply to march, carrying banners and giant handmade puppets, to the Cop City construction area in the Weelaunee Forest, where they would plant nearly 100 saplings on cleared forest land.

Soon after the march turned onto a road with almost no traffic on it, lines of cops in riot gear amassed to block demonstrators’ route to the forest. Dozens of police vehicles swarmed the area, including an armored urban tank dubbed “the Beast.” As the marchers pushed slowly forward, the police moved in with shields and batons, shooting rubber bullets and launching flash-bang grenades and tear-gas canisters at the tightly packed group. Clouds of tear gas rolled over dozens of nearby, clearly identified journalists, myself included.

The protesters stayed in formation; they turned and marched back to their starting point, with a handful of activists hurriedly planting the tree saplings along the roadside.

Journalist Matt Scott with the Atlanta Community Press Collective moves away from a cloud of tear gas thrown by Georgia law enforcement in Atlanta, Georgia on Monday, Nov. 13, 2023. 'Stop Cop City' activists gathered from across the United States to attend the 'Block Cop City' march to the construction site for the Atlanta Public Safety Training Center. (Photo by Carlos Berrios Polanco/Sipa USA)(Sipa via AP Images)

Journalists and protesters move away from a cloud of tear gas thrown by Georgia law enforcement personnel in Atlanta on Nov. 13, 2023.

Photo: Carlos Berrios/Sipa USA via AP

“Ready to Plant Trees”

Now deep into its second year of organized, multifaceted resistance, the movement to stop Cop City and defend the Atlanta forest has again and again brought to glaring light the old lie: that police can be trusted to respect civil rights.

“Despite numerous stated commitments from religious leaders and city officials to honor the right to protest, armed riot police terrorized the crowd with tear gas grenades, attack dogs, clubs and ballistic shields,” said the Block Cop City organizers in a statement following the march.

The Cop City project was, of course, not blocked on Monday, but the abolitionist, environmentalist movement once again proved its staying power against aggressive police repression. Since its inception, activists opposing the $90 million police training facility have been attacked by police, mass arrested, and, in the intolerable case of Manuel “Tortuguita” Terán, riddled with 57 police bullets and killed.

Protesters face felonies for handing out flyers and fundraising for camping supplies. The government explicitly deemed opposition to Cop City a criminal enterprise when, in September, it announced racketeering charges against 61 activists, most of whom already face state domestic terror charges, for typical social justice activities like information sharing and mutual aid organizing. One such defendant, Indigenous activist Victor Puertas, was handed over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and remains in detention facing deportation in addition to the egregious criminal charges.

“Now planting shovels are weapons. What’s next? Midnight raids for owners of muck boots?”

Meanwhile, an activist effort to get a public vote on Cop City on the recent November ballot had garnered sufficient signatures from the public — over 100,000 of them — but was obstructed by the city government in a blatant assault on democratic processes.

Following Monday’s demonstration, Atlanta Police Chief Darin Schierbaum held a press briefing to defend the cops’ use of tear gas and other weapons. He claimed the protesters were “prepared to do harm” and pointed to a line of gardening tools — dibbles specifically — police had taken from the march site. These were, of course, the tools activists were using to plant saplings.

“People were really ready to plant trees,” said an organizer who helped bring 75 oak seedlings, 25 pines, and elderberry cuttings to the event. (She asked to remain anonymous for fear of police harassment.) “First it was terrorism if you had muddy clothes,” Sam, a Texas-based organizer with the Austin Weelaunee Defense Society who asked for anonymity, told me. Police had used mud on the shoes of activists, in a forest, to justify the March arrests for domestic terrorism. “Now planting shovels are weapons. What’s next? Midnight raids for owners of muck boots?”

A sign is seen dropped by a protester after gas was spent during a demonstration in opposition to a new police training center, Monday, Nov. 13, 2023, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

A sign is discarded by a protester after tear gas was deployed by police during the Block Cop City day of action on Nov. 13, 2023, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

Photo: Mike Stewart/AP

“People Are Determined”

Despite the blunt, repressive instruments deployed by police, those fighting to defend the forest have never stopped. Instead, they adapted and shifted tactics. None of the activists I spoke to on Monday, many with skin and eyes still burning from tear gas, felt the march was a failure. They are already planning for their next steps.

A campaign, Uncover Cop City, is underway to put public pressure on insurance companies Nationwide and Accident Fund to end their subsidiaries’ liability contracts with the Atlanta Police Foundation, the corporate-backed nonprofit behind Cop City. Without the insurance contracts, Cop City’s construction is dead in the water. Previous direct targeting of companies involved in the project have led several contractors to drop out.

Civil Disobedience Actions Plan to Shut Down APEC CEO Summit San Francisco Labor Leaders to Join Forces

cross-posted from the Bay Area Climate Justice Spokescouncil

PRESS RELEASE for: No to APEC, November 15th – 7 AM

Civil Disobedience Actions Plan to Shut Down APEC CEO Summit

San Francisco Labor Leaders to Join Forces

WHAT:     No to APEC Action Against APEC CEO Summit

WHEN:    Wednesday, November 15, 2023, 7am

WHERE:  Main Entrance to Westfield Mall – 865 Market St.

WHO:       No to APEC Coalition

Photos and videos will be available for download here:
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1AMrrWa7Yz6bwD8YqnxCH44s5goVN7YNZ?usp=sharing

And here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1E6tcc46Wgk8dheoLcsJWUoId9aOwtWgP?usp=sharing

Contacts: No to APEC Coalition Media Team:

Bev Tang (773) 968-5628

Patrick Nevada  (808)388-8438

Contacts for Fast Access to Spokespeople on 11/15

Renata Pumarol +1 (646) 462-9281) (bilingual Spanish/English)

Alison Kirsch +1 (203) 520-7184

Celeste Baird, +1 (971) 295-8435, Wednesday, 8-11am, Thursday,  8-10 am

Daly Wettermark, +1 (25) 767-3773, Wednesday,12 noon – 5pm


Climate Bloc Spokespeople

  • Will Wiltschko, Bay Climate Action Coordinator (213) 224-8772
  • Khrizia Velacruz  (415) 200-6490
  • Brandon Lee, Mr.Brandon.Y.Lee@gmail.com Climate/Environmental Justice and Indigenous Rights Spokesperson: International Coalition for Human Rights in the Philippines
  • Rachel Rivera, mom of 6 from New York and hurricane sandy survivor. +1 (347) 243-7627
  • Chelsea (River) (they/them) Latina youth from New York +1 (631) 305-0416 chelseav.ny@gmail.com (bilingual Spanish/English)
  • Carlos Zaragoza, latine youth from Florida, +1(352) 514-4313
  • CJ Acevedo, latine youth from Florida

San Francisco, CA – Union leaders will join climate and human rights activists in a civil disobedience 7am Wednesday to protest the opening of the APEC CEO Summit where heads of state and representatives of big business, including the likes of Uber, GM, Boeing, Chevron, Amazon, Meta, and Google, will meet to promote policies favoring free trade and corporate profit. Organizers with the No to APEC Coalition, Climate Bloc, and labor unions hold he corporate CEOs at APEC directly responsible for extreme economic inequality, climate catastrophe, environmental plunder, and war.

Climate activists will host a rally to demand Citi and Exxon to stop funding fossil fuels. Citi’s involvement in the recent Exxon/Pioneer merger once again shows the companies continue their greenwashing having no intention to follow any climate pledges they have made and instead continue to prioritize profit over the climate crisis they have helped create. Activists will host a symbolic wedding at 7:20am to denounce the union between the CEOs of Citibank and ExxonMobil. 50 Crocker Galleria, 50 Post St.

“They call it free trade,” said Suzanne Ali from the Palestinian Youth Movement. “In reality, it is forced migration, it is destruction of the environment, it is destruction of our people, it is the depletion of natural resources, it is the fueling of war and genocide, and ultimately at the heart of it, is bloodthirst for profit.”

Will Wiltschko from the climate contingent of the No to APEC Coalition said “Young people everywhere are angry at world leaders for not taking action on climate change. The Indo-Pacific trade deal they’re expecting to announce this week ignores the climate reality that people around the world are facing.” In advance of Wednesday’s action” he states. “This ongoing collusion between APEC leaders and huge corporations won’t be tolerated.”

Many of the corporations represented at the CEO summit including GM, Amazon andKaiser have recently seen massive worker strikes and walkouts demanding betterpay and working conditions. The system employed by APEC claims to give women jobs, but women workers are especially exploited.

“The big tech agenda on women claims to advance women’s equality, when in reality these jobs pigeonhole women into low paying, exploitative jobs,” explains Katie Comfort of the International Women’s Alliance, “all while they make record breaking profits, and expand to new markets in these Asian countries.”

President of Labor Council Mike Casey states, “San Francisco working people have a long tradition of resisting oppressive regimes and corporations and our participation in today’s civil disobedience to shut down the APEC CEO Summit proudly carries on that tradition.”

Cody Urban of Resist US-Led War warns the partnership between the US military, the big tech corporations and their attempts at greenwashing the war industry with lofty claims of ‘sustainable tech’ while downplaying the larger issue at hand. “The free trade frameworks of APEC serve o expand the US military presence in the Asia Pacific, ensuring resources for transnational weapons corporations at the expense of the peoples’ land and sovereignty.”

 

For additional quotes or interviews, please contact: media.notoapec@gmail.com
For additional quotes and interviews on Thursday 11/16, you can also contact:
Scott Parkin, (415) 235-0596

Matt Leonard, +1 (619) 246-0325

Oregon Police Obsessively Spied on Siskiyou Rising Tide for Years, Even After Pipeline Fight Ended

cross-posted from The Intercept

Internal emails obtained by Siskiyou Rising Tide and Information for Public Use show police treating even the most placid social justice activities as sites of criminal threat.

Protesters opposed to the Jordan Cove Pipeline project in Coos Bay, Ore., stage a sit-in at the office of then-Gov. Kate Brown on Feb. 20, 2020.

Photo: Andrew Selsky/AP Photo

The activists of Siskiyou Rising Tide are not new to being watched. Founded in 2016 under the name Southern Oregon Rising Tide, the direct action climate justice group was a key player in the yearslong battle to stop the Jordan Cove Energy Project, a 229-mile natural gas pipeline that threatened to be the largest single emitter of greenhouse gasses in Oregon.

Alongside a coalition of environmental and Indigenous groups, Siskiyou Rising Tide faced major police counterinsurgency efforts, including aggressive monitoring funded by Pembina Pipeline Corporation, the Canadian fossil fuel company behind the project. But a dense web of interagency and corporate surveillance was unable to curtail the Jordan Cove opposition: In a rare victory for the climate movement, Pembina canceled the project in 2021.

A new trove of internal police emails, however, reveals that the intrusive and overreaching surveillance practices that developed around the pipeline project have remained firmly in place, even years after Pembina pulled out of the area.

Obtained through public records requests by Information for Public Use and Siskiyou Rising Tide and shared exclusively with The Intercept ahead of their publication, the emails show a policing apparatus that treats even the most placid social justice activities — like vigils and Juneteenth celebrations — as sites of criminal threat.

“As the Jordan Cove pipeline was defeated around 2020, Siskiyou Rising Tide pivoted to focusing on housing and racial justice issues, and these records requests were part of an attempt to understand what the surveillance landscape looked like post-Jordan Cove,” the Information for Public Use said in a statement shared with The Intercept.

The emails show that, from 2016 to 2023, the Medford Police Department coordinated heavy-handed police responses to peaceful rallies and protests, tracked activist groups’ social media pages, and consistently treated typical, First Amendment-protected activity as a potential crime worthy of law enforcement scrutiny.

Sam Becker, a member of Information for Public Use, wrote in a Signal message that the Medford Police Department’s overreach included surveilling a Black teenager’s vigil, pushing back against the Oregon Health Authority’s choice to fund a harm reduction nonprofit, and monitoring a reproductive justice organization after receiving a tip from a member of an evangelical anti-abortion group.

Information for Public Use and Siskiyou Rising Tide believe that the surveillance activities revealed in the email trove constitute a violation of both First Amendment protections and an Oregon-specific law, ORS 181A.250, which prohibits law enforcement agencies from collecting and maintaining “information about the political, religious or social views, associations or activities” of individuals, groups, or business, unless the police have “reasonable grounds to suspect the subject of the information is or may be involved in criminal conduct.”

“Monitoring social media accounts available to the general public does not violate any part of the constitution or any Oregon statute,” wrote Medford City Attorney, Eric B. Mitton, in a statement to The Intercept. “Law enforcement agencies, including the Medford Police Department, actively look at the public social media profiles of organizations and individuals when there is reported or self-evident concern of a public safety interest.”

While some activists involved in Jordan Cove protests had been arrested in the past, the police department emails do not contain evidence of ongoing criminal conduct. Rhetoric about “usual suspects” is scattered throughout the emails, but the activities which they are suspected of carrying out are peaceful protests, mutual aid projects, and protected political speech. The surveilled events are often described as involving a few dozen activists, gathering to express support for social, racial, and reproductive justice, before returning home without incident.

Oregon has long been a hub for far-right, white supremacist organizing, and Medford is located in a firmly conservative county. As is all too common, and indeed unsurprising, antifascist and left-wing organizers take up an outsized amount of law enforcement focus. The obtained emails evidence both the police’s disconcerting commitment to monitoring the left and an embarrassing squandering of city, state, and federal resources toward activities like picking through social media posts about social justice issues.

In one email exchange from June 2020, Medford Police Department patrol lieutenant Darrel J. Graham asked then-Medford Police Department crime analyst Divya Fisher to identify and investigate Siskiyou Rising Tide’s members after the group condemned local law enforcement officers’ treatment of unhoused people during the early months of the Covid-19 pandemic.

In response, Fisher and other officers combed through social media posts until landing on a Facebook post of one man, Leonard Higgins, who cited the Rising Tide and encouraged people to email the Medford City Council to urge an end to police harassment of unhoused people. The police then ran a background check on the 68-year-old longtime environmental activist.

In the entire email thread, “there is no focus on addressing the complaints against the police, i.e. remedying the wrong being done to unhoused people,” noted the Information for Public Use’s statement. A member of Siskiyou Rising Tide told The Intercept that at the time of that email exchange, the online information was out of date and Higgins was no longer involved with the group.

Israel’s Insidious Narrative About Palestinian Prisoners

Jeremy Scahill

The monitoring of protests and events for racial justice — predominantly after the summer of 2020, when nationwide Black liberation uprisings followed George Floyd’s murder — were particularly egregious in their overreach. The emails show numerous officers across departments dedicating hours of time and research to scrutinize people who attended a vigil organized for Aidan Ellison, a Black teen from nearby Ashland who was shot dead by a middle-aged white man.

Dozens of emails back and forth in late 2020 focus on the vigil and its organizers. One email thread contains an information sheet from the Medford Police Department’s “Tactical Information Unit,” offering a summary of research on the vigil plan. Other emails note that a camera installed by the city the previous summer could be used to watch the vigil, as well as the Facebook feeds of local activists known to the police.

As the vigil for the slain teen began, the cops quipped about the host of the Facebook livestream. “I figured he’d be there,” Jenette Bertocchi of the Ashland Police Department wrote to Medford’s Fisher while tuning in the organizer’s social media feed.

Fisher replied that “it wouldn’t be a party” without the activist in question. (Ashland Police did not respond to a request for comment. Fisher did not respond to The Intercept’s attempts to reach her.)

OREGON, USA - MARCH 28 : More than a hundred anti-fascist activists, Black Bloc, and anarchists are gathered on March 28, 2021 at Salem, Oregonâs State Capitol building to oppose a group of Trump, right-wing, Proud Boy and Qanon supporters who drove to the Capitol, in Oregon, United States. (Photo by John Rudoff/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Police officers stand near the Oregon State Capitol building during opposing demonstrations between antifascist and far-right groups in Salem, Ore., on March 28, 2021.

Photo: John Rudoff/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

In another multi-agency email thread from 2022, officers discuss the then-upcoming trial of Floyd’s murderer, former cop Derek Chauvin. “As you know, I believe these officers will be acquitted of the murder charges,” wrote Medford Police Sgt. Jason Antley. (In 2012, Antley was cleared of wrongdoing by a grand jury for shooting and killing a man wielding a knife.)

“This is likely to spark another large scale set of protests,” Antley added and asked his colleague to “dig around on social media to see if anyone is talking about this.” No disruptive protests took place in the area.

Following the fall of Roe v. Wade in 2022, the police focus turned toward reproductive rights protests. One group, the Rogue Valley Pepper Shakers, a queer-led organization founded in 2020 by young people in the area, was actively monitored for its reproductive justice activism; the group distributes contraception and reproductive health information, shares information about anti-abortion extremists, supports local queer spaces, and promotes harm reduction. According to an email from Medford Police Department’s Antley, the police were alerted to one planned abortion rights protest by Brett White, a member of the Rogue Valley Saltshakers, a far-right anti-abortion group that galvanized the creation of the Pepper Shakers.

“Seeing these emails has proven to us that the police see us as an active threat to our communities, even in the absence of evidence.”

“Seeing these emails has proven to us that the police see us as an active threat to our communities, even in the absence of evidence,” Sam Strong, a member of the Rogue Valley Pepper Shakers, told The Intercept. “The observation and keeping tabs is no shock to us however it’s extremely concerning.”

In some of the most recent email exchanges obtained, police and city officials expand on their surveillance efforts with an attempt to intervene in a radical health care group’s funding. In March, Stabbin’ Wagon, a harm reduction group that distributes free clean syringes and opioid reversal medications like Narcan, was awarded $1.5 million from the Oregon Health Authority to build a peer-respite center: a community-based alternative to the hospitalization model of recovery and mental health treatment.

In one email, the Medford City Manager Brian Sjothun asks a city lobbyist who they “need to contact at the State regarding this grant,” calling it a “disaster waiting to happen.” In another email, Medford Chief of Police Justin Ivens contacted the Oregon Health Authority directly, expressing “concerns” — seemingly an effort to pressure a state agency out of awarding funds to a legitimate, deserving nonprofit. In a 2021 email between the police department’s former crime analyst, Fisher, and other officers, Stabbin’ Wagon’s founder Melissa Jones was named as one of the cops’ “known protest players.”

The specific emails discussing Stabbin’ Wagon’s funds were already reported by Oregon-based independent news service, The Lund Report, in September. Now, they can now be understood in the context of years of police communications committed to suppressing and criminalizing all aspects of liberatory organizing in the local area — including efforts like Stabbin’ Wagon to provide services to simply keep people alive during an ongoing, deadly opioid crisis. Despite police and city meddling, Jones is reportedly on track to receive the Oregon Health Authority grant.

“City staff expressing opinions about a State grant award or asking State officials questions about that State grant award is not uncommon,” wrote Mitton, the city attorney. “It is routine and appropriate for inquiries to be made to public entities like the State of Oregon about how that public entity is allocating its resources.”

Stabbin’ Wagon is not alone in continuing its work despite the knowledge of consistent police surveillance and targeting; the heavily surveilled activists in Medford and beyond expect little else from law enforcement. Strong of the Rogue Valley Pepper Shakers told The Intercept, “I hope the police enjoy watching us serve our community with dignity and autonomy and even learn something from it, but then again — if they had any dignity, they wouldn’t be cops.”