Mass Climate Protest Disrupts NYC Financial District — Hundreds Risk Arrest

Thousands Flood Wall Street With Mass Sit-In for Climate Justice

For immediate release:

Thousands ‘Flood’ Financial District Following Sunday’s Historic March

Interviews available upon requests

Photos available here

New York, NY — 3,000 people dressed in blue are currently between Exchange Place and The Bull in Manhattan’s financial district, sitting down to interrupt the business day and targeting corporations and businesses financing and fueling the climate crisis.

“Communities that are first and most impacted by storms, floods and droughts are also on the frontlines of fighting the dig-burn-dump economy causing climate change,” said Michael Leon Guerrero of the Climate Justice Alliance. “We are flooding Wall Street to stop its financing of planetary destruction, and to make way for living economies that benefit people and the planet.”

“Many of us were also involved with Occupy Wall Street,” said Michael Premo, an organizer of Flood Wall Street and a Brooklyn-based artist. “Just like the financial crisis, the climate crisis is a product of an underlying political crisis. It’s the result of policies that serve the shortsighted interests of the few over the survival and well being of everyone.”

Yesterday’s historic 400,000-person march showed widespread support for action on climate change, and Flood Wall Street is confronting those who stand in the way of change and connecting the climate movement with a long tradition of nonviolent direct action.

“Throughout history, people have engaged in nonviolent civil disobedience in response to moral crises, when political leaders have failed to act,” said Vida James, a Flood Wall Street organizer. “What could constitute more of a moral crisis than the health and survival of our planet, our communities, and our grandchildren?”

Art, music, and giant visuals are prominent features of the festive demonstration, beginning the day with the Rude Mechanical Orchestra, a local activist marching band. Nearly a hundred people carried a 300-foot banner that read: “Capitalism = Climate Chaos — Flood Wall Street,” among many other visuals.

The day began with speakers from around the world that have been impacted by climate change, emphasizing that leadership on climate justice must come from below.

“The real solution to global warming is organizing workers worldwide for the construction of a new model, with justice, equality and respect for life,” said Elisa Estronioli, a Brazilian land-rights activist.

More updates coming.

MEDIA ADVISORY
September 22, 2014
Phone: (406) 356-6316
floodwallstreet@riseup.net
http://floodwallstreet.net

New York Times declares the end of the Iraq War

A Sign of the Times

..among other long-awaited happenings! The anonymous action conducted this morning was profound and  far-reaching.  From six printing locations located across the United States, 1.2 million copies of a faux edition of the New York Times made their way from the printing presses into the streets of the nation.

Not only, declares the Times, is the Iraq War over, but Thomas Friedman submits his resignation, Exxon-Mobil advocates alternative energy, a nationalized oil fund proposal passes Congress to fight Climate Change, and Monsanto defends the usage of ladybugs as more effective than pesticides.

The perpetrators of the long-planned and meticulous hoax worked long and in secret.  They are an amalgam of advocacy groups, climate change activists, and professional pranksters that routinely challenge the status quo through a broad range of activism, education, and downright foolery.

Download a PDF version [10 MB] HERE to read “All the News We Hope to Post”

available: http://www.risingtidenorthamerica.org/special/NYtimes_YesMenSpoof.pdf [~9.6 MB]

VIDEO COVERAGE

New York Times Special Edition Video News Release – Nov. 12, 2008 from H Schweppes on Vimeo.

RTNA in TIME Magazine: Taking on King Coal

Activists don?t want more coal plants, like this one near a Pennsylvania playground.

Read original article on TIME.com [HERE]
Wednesday, Nov. 05, 2008
Taking On King Coal
By Bryan Walsh

Nothing could sway the Dominion 11 from their mission–not the cops and certainly not the prospect of free food. Early on the morning of Sept. 15, activists from a range of environmental groups formed a human barrier to block access to a coal plant being built by Dominion in rural Wise County, Virginia. As acts of civil disobedience go, this wasn’t exactly Bloody Sunday. The police took a hands-off approach and even offered to buy the protesters breakfast if they unchained themselves. (They declined.) But the consequences were far from trivial. The activists who had formed the barrier to the construction site were arrested and charged with trespassing, and they eventually paid $400 each in fines. That’s nothing, of course, compared with the punishment the Dominion plant will inflict on the environment. If completed, the plant will emit 5.3 million tons of CO2 a year into the atmosphere, roughly the equivalent of putting a million more cars on the road.

The future of coal will dictate the future of the climate. Plants in the U.S. that burn this low-cost, high-carbon fuel account for about 40% of the country’s greenhouse-gas emissions, not to mention other air pollutants. Right now there are about 600 coal power plants in the U.S., and an additional 110 are in various stages of development. Without ways to capture the carbon burned in coal and sequester it underground, new plants all but guarantee billions of tons of future carbon emissions and essentially negate efforts to reduce global warming. “Business as usual can’t continue as long as coal is destroying the climate,” says Hannah Morgan, 20, one of the Dominion 11. “We are not going to back down.” Continue reading