About Chris Eaton

San Francisco digital media guy living in Buenos Aires. connect with him on twitter at @chr15_eat0n

Vote for Rising Tide North America!

Want to raise money for radical climate justice organizing without spending a dime? Now you can!

Rising Tide is excited to announce that we’re on CREDO Action June Donation Ballot. Being on the ballot makes us eligible for funding to use in our work fighting the root causes of climate change and supporting frontline communities throughout North America. How much we receive depends on you.

CREDO is a progressive activist network and a provider of mobile and long distance phone services, as well as the CREDO credit card. They donate a portion of their revenue to a wide range of nonprofit groups. Last year they donated more than $2 million.

Rising Tide could receive more than $40,000 from CREDO. Here’s the catch. CREDO asks its members to vote for which groups they think should receive funding. So your vote could secure money we need to support direct action and frontline communities challenging the climate crisis.

Anyone can become a CREDO member and vote, so this could be huge for Rising Tide.

Be sure to act before the deadline of June 30:

vote1. If you are a CREDO customer or CREDO action member go to www.credodonations.com and vote for Rising Tide on CREDO Action’s June Ballot

2. If you are not a member, you can become a CREDO Action member by signing a petition at CREDOAction.com. After you sign, head over to www.credodonations.com and vote for Rising Tide!

Rising Tide North America is going big in 2015. These funds couldn’t be more crucial. In the last two weeks alone, Rising Tide chapters have blockaded fracking sites in Texas and Shell’s Arctic drilling fleet in Seattle. For the fall, we’re undertaking our largest endeavor yet: organizing escalating actions to #FloodTheSystem across the continent.

Every vote we get, gives us a larger percentage of this month’s pot of money. So PLEASE share this with your friends, families, co-workers, folks you think might want to support us.

AND DON’T FORGET TO VOTE BEFORE THE JUNE 30 DEADLINE!

#GulfSouthRising Remembers and Resists BP’s Deepwater Horizon Oil Disaster

Today we remember and resist.

Five years ago BP’s Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico. 11 workers were killed and oil gushed into the Gulf for 87 days. This remains the largest accidental oil disaster in human history.

Today, Gulf South Rising—with representatives from across the region—are holding a memorial at BP’s headquarters in Houston, Texas. This afternoon, they will march in New Orleans to demand BP must stop lying and pay for what it’s done. BP must admit the oil remains in the Gulf region and continues to damage communities and ecosystems. BP must pay for the billions in health and environmental damages they caused.

Will you stand in solidarity with Gulf South Rising? There are two ways you can help right now.

  1. Give a shout out to #GulfSouthRising by sharing this photo from the march on BP headquarters to Facebook and Twitter right now!
    Make BP Pay
  2. Donate. Gulf South Rising is organizing powerful communities for climate justice in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. They are in it for the long haul and need your support.

Gulf South Rising are throwing down big this week.

The BP Week of Action will stage events in more than 13 cities culminating in at the BP Headquarters in Houston On April 20. Gulf South Rising is demanding BP must stop lying and pay what it owes from the Deepwater Horizon disaster, the largest oil disaster in history. 

Five years since the beginning of the BP oil disaster, the Gulf’s people and wildlife continue to reel from the impacts of BP’s negligence: health problems from exposure to oil and toxic chemical dispersants, diminished seafood populations that sustain local communities, disrupted ecosystems and wildlife die-offs.

Gulf South Rising is a regional movement organizing coordinated actions and events to highlight the impact of the global climate crisisThe BP Week of Action could be their most important effort yet.

In their own words, “Gulf coast residents are banding together and rising up to call for the restoration of our Gulf communities, cultures and environment. BP must stop lying and pay what they owe. The oil and gas industry must be held accountable for their ongoing desecration of our bioregion, and ultimately we must work towards a just transition to a more sustainable clean energy economy.”

Support climate resistance in the Gulf Coast region. Donate to Gulf South Rising today.

 

Resistance and Solidarity at COP20, Lima

cambiosistemico

An answer to the climate crisis is emerging right now from Lima, Peru, but it’s not COP20.

At COP 20, political elites haggled over a draft UN climate deal that they hope to ratify next year in Paris. It’s a bad deal. It is narrowly focused on unenforceable commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Those reductions won’t even begin till after 2020 and won’t keep temperature rises below two degrees celsius. At the same time, rich countries, and the corporate lobbyists behind them, worked for a deal that won’t stop them from expanding the extractive industries cooking the planet. And it does nothing to help poor nations adapt to climate change and sustainably lift their people out of poverty.

But outside COP20, a real response to the crisis is emerging: solidarity and resistance.

Thousands of people, representing indigenous communities and their allies from all over Latin America and the world came together for the Cumbre De Los Pueblos, (People’s Summit).

The People’s Summit was an unprecedented moment, particularly for bringing together so many communities from the Amazon and Andean Highlands of Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador. Many of these communities are actively resisting extractive projects like gold mining, petroleum extraction, and logging. These communities are connecting their struggles to protect their water from extraction, forests from expropriation and communities from state violence around a framework of justicia climática (climate justice). They are addressing the need to confront neoliberal capital, the system that finances and drives the climate crisis.

Nilda Rojas

The People’s summit hasn’t just created a space for solidarity. Its also created a space for resistance. The communities present are demanding autonomy, so when the news broke that Evo Morales, the President of Bolivia, might speak at the event, many were furious. Nilda Rojas, an Indigenous woman of Consejo Nacional de Ayllus y Markas del Qullasuyu explained that a summit with government officials is not a peoples summit. Her community faces state violence that Evo Morales is responsible for. His presence would undercut the autonomy and potential of the summit and communities fighting for their land and water.

People rallied against government inclusion. On Monday, activists with the Ecuadoran group YASunidos used drums and banners to disrupted a speach by the mayor of Lima. After the disruption, Caravana Climática used its radio equipment to broadcast and amplify voices from dozens of indigenous communities saying they were unhappy with government inclusion. The dissent spread, and in the end Evo Morales did not speak.

Conga No Va

On Tuesday, hundreds from  the region of Cajamarca, Peru arrived in Lima. They immediately took the streets with a giant, river like banner. The people of Cajamarca are fighting the expansion of one of the largest open pit gold mines on the planet, Minas Conga, owned by the U.S. based Newmont Mining Corporation. The energy intensive mine threatens the water supply of Cajamarca, and state repression of protests has lead to the murder of at least five community members.

On Wednesday, up to 20,000 people took the streets in Lima to march in defense of Mother Earth. Nowhere in this march of 20,000 indigenous people, ecologists, feminists, anti-capitalists, could you get away from beautiful banners, and contagious protest songs for land and water and against neoliberal imperialism.

policestop2

Demonstrators also confronted the World Climate Summit, a meeting of representatives from Multinational corporations. Even though the Police had used tear gas to disperse the initial march, many reconvened in a park closer to the Hilton where the corporate summit was gathering. We marched straight to the Hilton but were stopped one block from the target by a dense police line. In sight of the summit, we held a rally, standing in solidarity with those killed by state violence and denouncing the multi-nationals poisoning our land, water and climate.

semillas

If there is one lesson from the week, that is never doubt that you are alone in the fight for climate justice. We are a truly global, and growing, movement.

As we learn to work together, we are creating a real answer to the climate crisis, one based on communities protecting their land, water and forests from the industries destroying the planet. We are coming together to keep fossil fuels in the ground, ensure forests belong to the communities that live there and demanding water be protected as a common good.

The political elites at COP20 won’t end the climate crisis. We will.

Update, December 14: Edited to reflect that the COP20 released a draft climate accord in the early morning of Sunday, December 14.

Mass Climate Protest Disrupts NYC Financial District — Hundreds Risk Arrest

Thousands Flood Wall Street With Mass Sit-In for Climate Justice

For immediate release:

Thousands ‘Flood’ Financial District Following Sunday’s Historic March

Interviews available upon requests

Photos available here

New York, NY — 3,000 people dressed in blue are currently between Exchange Place and The Bull in Manhattan’s financial district, sitting down to interrupt the business day and targeting corporations and businesses financing and fueling the climate crisis.

“Communities that are first and most impacted by storms, floods and droughts are also on the frontlines of fighting the dig-burn-dump economy causing climate change,” said Michael Leon Guerrero of the Climate Justice Alliance. “We are flooding Wall Street to stop its financing of planetary destruction, and to make way for living economies that benefit people and the planet.”

“Many of us were also involved with Occupy Wall Street,” said Michael Premo, an organizer of Flood Wall Street and a Brooklyn-based artist. “Just like the financial crisis, the climate crisis is a product of an underlying political crisis. It’s the result of policies that serve the shortsighted interests of the few over the survival and well being of everyone.”

Yesterday’s historic 400,000-person march showed widespread support for action on climate change, and Flood Wall Street is confronting those who stand in the way of change and connecting the climate movement with a long tradition of nonviolent direct action.

“Throughout history, people have engaged in nonviolent civil disobedience in response to moral crises, when political leaders have failed to act,” said Vida James, a Flood Wall Street organizer. “What could constitute more of a moral crisis than the health and survival of our planet, our communities, and our grandchildren?”

Art, music, and giant visuals are prominent features of the festive demonstration, beginning the day with the Rude Mechanical Orchestra, a local activist marching band. Nearly a hundred people carried a 300-foot banner that read: “Capitalism = Climate Chaos — Flood Wall Street,” among many other visuals.

The day began with speakers from around the world that have been impacted by climate change, emphasizing that leadership on climate justice must come from below.

“The real solution to global warming is organizing workers worldwide for the construction of a new model, with justice, equality and respect for life,” said Elisa Estronioli, a Brazilian land-rights activist.

More updates coming.

MEDIA ADVISORY
September 22, 2014
Phone: (406) 356-6316
floodwallstreet@riseup.net
http://floodwallstreet.net